Jobs Homes Autos For Sale










Your health: Try ginger to ease muscle pain
Daily Herald Staff and wire reports

Ginger reduces muscle pain after exercise by 25 percent, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Pain. Subjects consumed doses of ginger for eight days before lifting weights and reported a reduction in muscle pain.

 

 1 of 1 
 
print story
email story
Published: 10/4/2010 12:10 AM

Send To:

E-mail:
To:

From:

Name:
E-mail:

Comments:

Body basics

Ginger reduces muscle pain after exercise by 25 percent, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Pain. Subjects consumed doses of ginger for eight days before lifting weights and reported a reduction in muscle pain. Further studies are planned to determine a proper dose.

Heavenly body

As arduous as exercise can be, and as ardently as yoga class namastes stress the body-spirit connection, and as often as one wishes to take the Lord's name in vain during the third set of squat-thrusts, it was only a matter of time before someone put it all together: Enter "Body Gospel." Donna Richardson, fitness guru on the President's Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, has released a new workout DVD, "Give Praise. Get Results" that includes what she calls holy-robics such as Hallelujah Hands and Praise Lunges.

Kids' concussions

Lawmakers are considering legislation that would establish minimum guidelines for how school districts should handle students recovering from concussions.

The minimum guidelines proposed in the U.S. House include displaying an informational poster on concussions for students, keeping student-athletes who are suspected of suffering from concussions out of games and practices, notifying their parents and sending them to an evaluation by a health care professional.

It also includes drafting a plan, shared with the school, that helps students suffering from concussions ease back into the classroom and offering specialized help if they are not recovering.

Rosebud!

It seems a distant memory now, but winter will bring sledding season again, along with its dangers.

Sledding accidents cause an estimated 21,000 injuries treated in emergency rooms each year, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics.

Children age 10 to 14 were most commonly injured, and boys were 60 percent of all cases, mostly from colliding with other objects.

Head injuries made up one-third of the injuries, and traumatic brain injuries were most likely to occur with snow tubes, possibly due to its limiting the passenger's vision.