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Topinka wins, Krishnamoorthi, Miller close in comptroller races
By Barbara Vitello | Daily Herald Staff

Judy Baar Topinka

 

David Miller

 

S. Raja Krishnamoorthi

 

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Published: 2/2/2010 8:33 PM | Updated: 2/3/2010 11:10 AM

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The political resurrection of Judy Baar Topinka seems to have begun with the former three-term state treasurer on her way to winning the Republican primary for comptroller.

With 99 percent of precincts unofficially reporting, the Riverside Republican had a substantial lead, approximately 59 percent of the vote, over fellow contenders Jim Dodge, an Orland Park trustee and Metra board member, and William Kelly, a Chicago television producer and former director of National Taxpayers United of Illinois.

Topinka said Dodge had called her to concede.

"Mr. Dodge conceded in a genteel fashion," she said. "He's a classy candidate and it was kind of him to do what he did."

Topinka said she had not heard from William Kelly, a Chicago television producer and former director of National Taxpayers United of Illinois.

Commenting on her victory, Topinka said, "I think the public understands that we are in a fiscal crisis the likes of which this state has not seen and they are going to entrust the fiscal office to people who know what they're doing."

If she prevails in November's general election, Topinka says she will push for a balanced budget and for the state to pay its bills on time.

"We're ready to hit the ground running," she said.

On the Democratic side, with 99 percent of precincts unofficially reporting, the race for the Democratic nomination appears too close to call. State Rep. David Miller of Lynwood had 46 percent of the vote compared to Hoffman Estates attorney S. Raja Krishnamoorthi's 45 percent of the vote.

Clinton "Clint" Krislov, a Wilmette tax attorney had 7 percent of the vote. Green Party candidate nominee Erika Schafer of Chicago ran unopposed.

Miller wasn't overly concerned with the tight race. He said he's been in this position before. Ten years ago, he won his seat in the General Assembly by 29 votes following a recount.

"We're in a better position than we were 10 years ago," he said. "We've looked at the numbers, where we are now and we're very confident."

In a prepared statement e-mailed early Wednesday, Krishnamoorthi declined to concede the race.

"Until every vote is counted fully, accurately and completely, this race is not over," Krishnamoorthi said.