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Kenilworth businessman to enter 10th Dist. Congressional race
By Mick Zawislak | Daily Herald Staff

Robert Dold

 

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Published: 9/12/2009 12:03 AM

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Family business owner Robert Dold of Kenilworth will join an already crowded field running for the 10th Congressional seat being vacated by Mark Kirk.

Dold, 40, is scheduled to announce for the Republican nomination Monday at Rose Pest Solutions, his Northfield-based business.

In a statement, Dold said he'll promote policies that create jobs, particularly for small businesses. He said families are struggling and small businesses are being forced to close.

"I understand what it means to meet a payroll each week. Our company has been directly impacted by the rising cost of health care and ever increasing taxes," he said in the statement.

Rose Pest Solutions, founded in 1860, was described as the oldest pest control company in the country. Dold, its president, is the third generation involved in the business. He previously worked in Washington as counsel to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, according to the release.

While two-thirds of all jobs are created by small business, the current Democratic administration has directed very little stimulus funds to those sources, he contends.

Curbing spending and lowering debt are other goals, he said.

"I am running to bring small business common sense to Washington," he said.

Dold will be the fourth announced Republican candidate, joining Winnetka businessman Dick Green; state Rep. Elizabeth Coulson of Glenview; and business owner Patricia Bird of Mount Prospect.

Bird said earlier this month she was dropping out but has reconsidered.

On the Democratic side, Wilmette business consultant Dan Seals is making a third consecutive try at the seat held by Kirk since 2000. State Rep. Julie Hamos of Evanston and attorney Elliott Richardson of Highland Park also have announced.

Kirk is running for the U.S. Senate, leaving the 10th Congressional seat available for what is expected to be an expensive campaign with national party involvement.