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Sneak peek at Lutheran General's new tower
By Madhu Krishnamurthy | Daily Herald Staff

Ninety-three percent of the construction waste from the Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital tower project was recycled.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The patient rooms include two-way closets, left, so staff can stock items such as linen and towels without going into the rooms.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

Al Manshum, vice president of facilities and construction for Advocate Health Care, explains how the colors change and move on tiles in a family lounge of the new patient tower.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The new patient tower includes a rooftop garden planted with sedum, a drought-resistant plant that requires no watering and is meant to absorb rainwater.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

A view of the Chicago skyline from the 11th floor of the new patient tower.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

Ninety-three percent of the construction waste from the Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital tower project was recycled.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

Troy Hoggard, architect who designed the new patient tower at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital, said it was designed to promote healing.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The heritage wall on the first floor of the new patient tower at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital gives a chronological timeline of the hospital's growth.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

Al Manshum, vice president, facilities and construction at Advocate Health Care, shows the Green Gallery at the new patient tower.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

Al Manshum, vice president, facilities and construction at Advocate Health Care, explains how the private rooms have colored lights, above, which patients can control and change themselves.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

Al Manshum, vice president, facilities and construction at Advocate Health Care, shows how artwork is used to hide some of the medical needs in the patient rooms.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

Doves suspended from the ceiling of the new patient tower lobby at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital in Park Ridge add a touch of tranquilility.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

This is the view looking northeast from the 11th floor of the tower. Al Manshum, vice president, facilities and construction at Advocate Health Care, said the tower was designed to allow the most amount of natural light in.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

This is the Green Gallery at the new patient tower at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The reception area of Advocate Lutheran General's Children's Hospital portion of the new patient tower includes a handwashing station with colorful lights.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The 11th floor of the new patient tower at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital provides a great view of northeastern Cook County. The tower's glass facade lets in an abundance of natural light. It includes 192 private rooms, a Green Gallery, Heritage Wall and a green roof.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

This is the view looking west from the 11th floor of the tower. Al Manshum, vice president, facilities and construction at Advocate Health Care said the tower was designed to let the most amount of natural light in.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The new patient tower at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital was designed to promote healing by architect Troy Hoggard.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The patient rooms include two-way closets, left, so staff can stock items such as towels without going into the rooms.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The green roof of the new patient tower has plants that do not require any watering at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital in Park Ridge.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

View of the design from the 11th floor.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The green roof of the new patient tower has plants that do not require any watering.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

The Meditation Garden is tucked away between the buildings and offers an outdoor private area for families.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

This is the new patient tower at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital/Advocate Lutheran General Children's Hospital in Park Ridge.

 

George LeClaire | Staff Photographer

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Published: 7/7/2009 3:01 PM | Updated: 7/7/2009 6:35 PM

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From its green rooftop covered with sedum to its curved glassed exterior, Advocate Lutheran General Hospital's new eight-story patient tower can't be missed either from the air or from miles away.

The 192-bed tower debuts this weekend as the new face of the 50-year-old Park Ridge hospital. The public is invited to take a sneak peek of the facility Sunday, though patients won't move in until July 18.

The tower adds 28 new beds, increasing the total number of beds between Lutheran General's main hospital and children's hospital to 675.

All the beds in the new tower are in private single-patient rooms with floor-to-ceiling glass windows. Each floor has family lounges with views of the Chicago skyline.

The tower's energy-efficient design is a testament to environmentally-conscious construction and shows the hospital's commitment to sustainability, officials said Tuesday morning during a press preview of the facility.

Roughly 43 percent of the tower is built with recycled and natural materials such as terrazzo flooring and wood. Daylight and rainwater management are incorporated throughout the structure. The building uses 23 percent less energy through the use of energy-efficient materials, officials said.

The rooftop plant bed acts as insulation. It also helps slow the flow of rainwater to storm sewers as the drought-resistant sedum absorbs large quantities of water, releasing it slowly, said Troy Hoggard, architect and tower designer.

All rainwater is collected on-site and filtered through the 31,000 native plants before reaching city storm sewers. A porous pavement for the front drive allows water to be absorbed into 3 feet of stone beneath.

This innovative rain management system eliminates the need to water the plants and is a key factor in the environmentally-friendly design, Hoggard said.

"Sustainability was a big driver in this project," Hoggard said.

The $200 million project has been in the works for five years. About $25 million was raised through the community.

"Philanthropy has played a huge role in this building, but it also plays a huge role for us as a hospital," said David Stark, hospital president. "We feel like we're bringing a new, living, breathing building into this world to serve this community."

Officials aim to make it the largest hospital with a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design gold certificate in Illinois and the Midwest, said Al Manshum, vice president of facilities and construction for Advocate Health Care.

The tower lobby features a soothing, living light wall that changes color with interaction. Blue doves suspended from the ceiling provide an air of tranquillity. Natural light streams in through a glass stairwell on one corner of the building, and through floor-to-ceiling windows at the end of corridors along each floor.

Patients and visitors can relax in a healing garden that joins the space between the old hospital building and new tower. The children's hospital portion of the tower on the second floor includes a rooftop garden where patients and their families can engage in activities.

Another major hospital in the Northwest suburbs also is building a patient tower. Next summer, Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Heights will debut its eight-story patient care addition, which includes a renovated emergency department, and seven-level parking deck.

Open house

Advocate Lutheran General Hospital is dedicating its new patient tower Sunday.

Location: 1775 Dempster St., Park Ridge

Time: 1:30 p.m., ceremony and blessing by clergy in a tent behind the hospital; 2-4 p.m. tours

Reservations: Those desiring to attend are asked to call (800) 323-8622