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2 motorists injured after coyote causes head-on crash in Volo
By Lee Filas | Daily Herald Staff
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Published: 2/5/2008 12:00 PM | Updated: 2/5/2008 8:01 PM

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Two motorists were injured after a wandering coyote caused a head-on collision on Route 12 in Volo at 6:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Sgt. Christopher Thompson of the Lake County Sheriff's Office said a 2007 Scion driven by Christine Blair, 21, of Antioch, was head south on Route 12 about a half-mile south of Route 120 when a coyote wandered out of an open field and into her lane.

He said Blair struck the coyote before spinning out of control, crossing the median and into the northbound lanes of Route 12.

Her car slammed head-on into a 2006 Suzuki Aerio driven by Cynthia Wolf, 56, of Schaumburg.

Witnesses to the accident called emergency personnel and put out a fire that had started in the engine compartment of the Aerio, Thompson said.

He said the northbound lanes of Route 12 were closed for two hours while Wauconda Fire and Rescue and the Fox Lake Fire Protection District handled the accident scene.

He said both drivers were transported to Centegra Northern Illinois Medical Center in McHenry. Officials at Centegra said Blair remains in serious condition but that there was no information available on Wolf.

The coyote was killed.

"This is just one of those unfortunate accidents that occur," he said. "And even though this one seemed unavoidable, we always remind motorists to be aware of surroundings when it comes to deer and other animals that might cross your path while driving."

Chris McCloud, spokesman for the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, said coyotes are becoming more willing to be seen in Lake and McHenry counties. He said people should become more aware of them.

"As areas become more developed over the past five to 10 years, they are becoming more and more comfortable with their changing surroundings and are willing to come out more," he said.

"That's not to say they'll come up to you because they are scared of humans and society, but they are more comfortable with it and will do things like this."