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Lake County board candidates spar over roadwork
By Lee Filas | Daily Herald Staff
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Published: 1/17/2008 12:12 AM

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Lake County Board District 5 challenger Kirk Denz says incumbent Bonnie Thomson Carter hasn't done enough to secure roadwork funding.

However, Carter said she has a track record of getting roads improved throughout her home district and has worked well with state and county officials to keep traffic moving as best it can.

Denz, 39, of Ingleside, is facing off against the four-term incumbent Carter, 52, of Ingleside, on the Feb. 5 primary ballot.

No Democrats have filed to run in the primary, but whoever wins the Republican contest could still face a challenge on the November general election ballot.

District 5 encompasses Fox Lake, Ingleside, Lakemoor Volo and Wauconda.

Denz said Carter is "conveniently pointing her finger at other politicians" in blame for the traffic congestion throughout Lake County and District 5.

"This is not leadership," he added. "A leader takes responsibility and lays out a plan to get it done."

However, Carter said that over the last 12 years, she has worked on countless road projects, at both the state and county levels.

She listed improvements on Monaville Road and Wilson Road, as well as intersection improvements at Wilson Road and Route 134 and the coming project on Route 60 at Petersen Road.

In addition, she said she has been part of a group designed to bring the Route 120 bypass project to fruition.

"I know the facts about it," she said. "And my record on road improvements speaks for itself."

Denz cited an article published over the summer in a national news magazine that showed the Chicago area ranking 14th in the nation in longest commutes.

"If she has done her job, then why do we have the 14th-worst commute in the nation?" he said. "It doesn't sound like she's done her job if that's the case."

Denz said county board commissioners should prioritize roads that need repairs and work with the Illinois Department of Transportation to get those roads taken care of.

Carter said that's exactly what's happening now. Troublesome roads throughout the county have been prioritized, and the county has worked with the state to improve them. The most recent example, she said, is the Route 120 bypass project.

"I truly hope construction will start in the next couple of years," she said. "My record on road construction speaks for itself."